The Unstoppable Marketer®

89. A Community-Centric Approach to Brand Building w/ Lindsay White | The Little Milk Bar

May 21, 2024 Trevor Crump & Mark Goldhardt
89. A Community-Centric Approach to Brand Building w/ Lindsay White | The Little Milk Bar
The Unstoppable Marketer®
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The Unstoppable Marketer®
89. A Community-Centric Approach to Brand Building w/ Lindsay White | The Little Milk Bar
May 21, 2024
Trevor Crump & Mark Goldhardt

As we peel back the layers of the baby product industry, we question the necessity of the plethora of gadgets and gizmos marketed to new parents. Are they essentials or cleverly spun luxuries? Lindsay and I unpack the truth behind these products and advocate for transparency in marketing, all while navigating the complexities of advertising breastfeeding accessories amidst social media restrictions. This episode promises to leave you questioning the next baby shower gift list you encounter and, perhaps, even your own consumer habits.

Wrapping things up, we dive into the cultural conversations that swirl around us every day—from the influence of celebrity diets to the representation of breastfeeding in pop culture. This discussion isn't just for parents; it's for anyone who's ever wondered about the societal tapestries we're all part of. So, whether you're feeding a newborn or simply fed up with unrealistic standards, join us for a discussion that's as nourishing for the mind as it is for the soul.

Please connect with Trevor on social media. You can find him anywhere @thetrevorcrump

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

As we peel back the layers of the baby product industry, we question the necessity of the plethora of gadgets and gizmos marketed to new parents. Are they essentials or cleverly spun luxuries? Lindsay and I unpack the truth behind these products and advocate for transparency in marketing, all while navigating the complexities of advertising breastfeeding accessories amidst social media restrictions. This episode promises to leave you questioning the next baby shower gift list you encounter and, perhaps, even your own consumer habits.

Wrapping things up, we dive into the cultural conversations that swirl around us every day—from the influence of celebrity diets to the representation of breastfeeding in pop culture. This discussion isn't just for parents; it's for anyone who's ever wondered about the societal tapestries we're all part of. So, whether you're feeding a newborn or simply fed up with unrealistic standards, join us for a discussion that's as nourishing for the mind as it is for the soul.

Please connect with Trevor on social media. You can find him anywhere @thetrevorcrump

Speaker 1:

Yo, what's going on everybody? Welcome to the Unstoppable Marketer Podcast. With me, as always, is my co-host, mark Goldhart. Mark Goldhart, how are you doing? Great, great to be here, excited. Yeah, we're in a little bit of a different setup so I'm like I'm used to you being right here.

Speaker 2:

That's so nice.

Speaker 1:

Or right here.

Speaker 2:

Foilage Fern, fern, yeah Nice.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, I'm doing good. Good week.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

How was Mother's Day?

Speaker 2:

Well, the weekend was crazy. We had that Aurora Borealis event. What? Is that, the nice solar storm that happened, the northern lights you weren't aware, like you saw it. Yeah, oh, barely. Oh, I didn't see it.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I saw a friend of ours in Oregon post about it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, if you went to the mountains you could see them. Okay, cool. I didn't go far enough to see them, great, so I didn't.

Speaker 1:

You should have gone up to your cabin.

Speaker 2:

I should have, I should have, but and then all the kids were acting crazy all weekend and I'm pretty sure Because of the lights, there was a little extra electricity in the air.

Speaker 1:

Got them a little riled up.

Speaker 2:

Got them a little.

Speaker 1:

Were they good for your wife or mother's day, though?

Speaker 2:

No not at all. No, they were. I mean, they're sweet in the morning, but then they were just grumpy all day and mad and like they wouldn't go to sleep. It was weird, interesting. There was some weird juju in the air, literally. Yeah literally yeah, electricity, yeah, man, but have you ever thought about, like when you look up at the night sky, that all those stars could be dead and we wouldn't know?

Speaker 1:

I've never thought about that in my life never, never think about, like every time I go camping like man.

Speaker 2:

All these stars could be dead and we wouldn't know for like hundreds of years.

Speaker 1:

Well, because isn't the light from the star, the sun reflection?

Speaker 2:

The what.

Speaker 1:

You're saying these stars are dead.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because they're light years away. Right, they're hundreds of light years away, and so you wouldn't know if it died for hundreds of years, unless you could, like, measure the gravitational waves which, apparently, they're starting to.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I've never thought about that.

Speaker 2:

It's kind of freaky that we could be all alone in the universe. The last star, the last living star. Yeah, well, the sun, the sun which is a star, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Well, I'm excited for today's episode. Me too. We're going to learn some things. We always do Usually some things we always do Usually yeah.

Speaker 2:

Not always.

Speaker 1:

I think we will today for sure.

Speaker 2:

I think we will yeah.

Speaker 1:

Well, let's introduce our guest. Yeah, let's do it. Okay. Well, we got Lindsay White right, yeah?

Speaker 3:

How are you Lindsay?

Speaker 1:

Good, how are you Good? She is the owner, founder, ceo, chief mother of Little Milk Bar, which is a brand that empowers mothers to breastfeed. Yeah, did I get that right?

Speaker 3:

Empowers breastfeeding parents.

Speaker 1:

Now I'm confused. Yeah, you got it right. We were somewhere there, right? Yeah, how are you Welcome?

Speaker 3:

Good Thanks. This is a cool space.

Speaker 1:

This is a cool space. Yeah, we really like it.

Speaker 3:

I'm so excited to talk all about breastfeeding to two men, that's all we're here to talk about with you Tips tricks Two men, but we do have wives that have gone on the breastfeeding journey.

Speaker 1:

Your wife is on one right now.

Speaker 2:

She is currently on one.

Speaker 3:

You have a newborn no Under a year.

Speaker 2:

No, she just turned one. Oh she did A week and a half ago. Little Anna is one.

Speaker 1:

That's exciting.

Speaker 2:

But still on that breastfeeding journey.

Speaker 1:

I consider newborns under a year still.

Speaker 2:

You do, I do. Yeah, newborn ends at like four months, right? Yeah, I agree, and it's just a baby. Well, maybe it's because it's been five years for me. Yeah, Maybe that's it Like. Once they hit like five months, you're like oh, that's a baby.

Speaker 1:

Like my brother has a daughter, his daughter, my niece, is like she turns one in like a week, yeah, and I just always consider her like the newborn baby, oh, the newborn. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Until someone else in your family has a baby, then the baby's the newborn. That could be the case.

Speaker 2:

It's funny when you have like a two, like a toddler, and you still think it's a baby. And then you see a baby and you're like oh my gosh. I have a giant monster in my house not a baby.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's very true.

Speaker 3:

But good, close vantage point but obviously we're not breastfeeding journey third oh, third, so you have three kids three kids.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we're all three kids, oh yeah we are yeah, I have a funny story about breastfeeding. You do, yes, so with my brother and sister-in-law unless you're just sharing their information no, well, yes and no so we were just just HIPAA violation.

Speaker 1:

No, not a HIPAA violation here. We were just in Orlando and we were taking, we just got off a cruise and we were taking a bus and they were driving us straight to Disneyland or Disney World. We went from a cruise to Disney World and our driver was we were really nervous because we had said the whole time if we don't, if we can't make it to the park before 11, it's not worth it, cause Disney world tickets are so expensive for a family of five, right, and so it was just like it wasn't gonna be worth it if it was there. And we were like when I was like mapping out where we were going to get there at like 10, 30 and then have to walk and get into the park, cause Disney world's massive. Like you don't just it's not like Disneyland, where you're like like a taxi or a cab drops you off and you're there in like three minutes. Like Disney world is you got to take a ferry or a tram, like it's crazy, you know.

Speaker 1:

And so I'm like stressed out and our driver was missing every single turn, like I was like I was mapping it out, and we were kind of in this like little, like smaller bus, and my sister-in-law, my wife's husband was sitting, me and my wife were sitting right here, and and then the next row was my sister-in-law and the baby.

Speaker 1:

And then my brother was sitting on the other bus seat like same row but between the aisles, separate seat and the bus was one of those buses where you know how, like, the driver sits lower than where you kind of have to walk up, and so the windshield was lower and I was really wanting him to make a turn and I couldn't tell if he was making the turn and so I leaned forward. I got to make sure this the mic is still hearing me. I leaned forward like this to um, like see if he was going to put his blinker on, and my head went right up to my sister-in-law's boob and she was breastfeeding, like she's breastfeeding, and it looked like I was watching her like very, very close, closely, and my brother couldn't tell from this angle. So he's like, trevor, what are you doing? And I'm like just making sure this guy's turning, and then both of them just like cracked up that is funny I mean she was like.

Speaker 1:

I mean you were like inches from my, my boob and I was, and you didn't know, I had no idea I was locked in on the driver and he missed the turn.

Speaker 2:

And he still missed the turn.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so we made it up All that family awkwardness only to still miss the turn.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So Well, tell us, Lindsay, why did you think it was necessary or important for you to start a company that empowers breastfeeding?

Speaker 3:

Because so I have three kids. My daughter, Allie, is my oldest, she's 12. And when I was breastfeeding her, I didn't have any friends. I was breastfeeding. I didn't know anyone that breastfed. It was the hardest dang job and nobody ever told me, like I had no idea how much they fed. I didn't know if she was getting enough. Uh, I thought I was doing everything wrong. And after you have a baby, it's so like you feel so isolated already, like you have this whole new life and you're like I'm trying to keep this baby alive and so it's a big feat to even just leave the house to go do things so and then throw breastfeeding on top of it and it's even more. You're like I need to schedule my whole day around her breastfeed or her feeding schedule Totally.

Speaker 3:

So that's what I did, because I was raised that, like you are polite, and if you're with people and you need to breastfeed, you get up and you go to a private room and you feed, and so that made it even more isolating. I breastfed her for 12 months and I felt like I was in a dark room feeding for 12 months. It sucked.

Speaker 1:

Because you're there all the time. It's so true, yeah.

Speaker 3:

And then you get invited to a barbecue with friends. You're like, yes, we're getting out of the house. We're going to go as soon as you get there the baby's hungry. As soon as you get there, the baby's hungry and they're like oh, you can go feed in my room. Yeah, so you go feed in the room and my husband's out enjoying himself.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Then by the time she's done feeding, it's over Sure.

Speaker 2:

And time to go.

Speaker 3:

So when I got pregnant with my second baby, my son Koda, I made a promise to myself when I was pregnant and I was like I'm going to have more confidence this time around, I'm not going to let it run my life Like I'm just going to continue on with my life while I breastfed this baby and it changed everything for me. I didn't have postpartum depression. I was out, I was at a barbecue feeding and just continue on my conversation with my best friends, and nobody cared. So I was feeding at my friend's wedding and my mom came over to me and she said do you really think you should be doing that here? Maybe you should go to the bathroom and do that.

Speaker 3:

And I was like if you had said this to me five years ago, I would have been mortified, like so embarrassed gotten right up from my seat in tears, went to the bathroom and fed him, cause I had done that with my daughter fed in a dirty bathroom stall.

Speaker 3:

But instead I had more confidence so I told her no, I'm good, Thanks, and that was it. So on my drive home I turned to my husband and I was like Pete, I want to start a brand that's like the best friend for every mom that's breastfeeding, to just let her know her legal rights. Yeah, Because if I had known with my first, if a friend was like at Cheesecake Factory with me eating and I went to the bathroom to feed, instead they were like hey, you can just feed right here.

Speaker 3:

I don't care. That would have made a world of difference for me, so I wanted to be that best friend for everybody Awesome.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and that can be isolated depending on family situation and family culture and family norms. Right, because every family is different. Every individual situation is different. But you know my wife, she did not experience that because her family is very that's open about it. I love that a small farming, community, family, right, and they're, everyone does it. It's like it's not a big deal. You know, they just have like a towel or something. They're always someone's breastfeeding all the time in their house.

Speaker 2:

There's eight kids five daughters, and like they all have kids. Yeah, but she was isolated from a, from a experience because when she started, like you said, when she started breastfeeding, it was miserable. It was incredibly painful for her. She felt like she was doing it wrong, she didn't and she couldn't relate with her family because everyone else was like, oh, it's just easy, right.

Speaker 3:

And she couldn't relate with her family because everyone else was like oh, it's just easy, Right? Well, people say it comes natural. And it may be a natural act, but it does not always come naturally. It is a learned experience between you and the baby. The baby has to learn to latch properly and you need to learn how to get their mouth open super wide. It's a lot.

Speaker 1:

Well, and the scary part I remember for my wife is my wife's pretty similar like not everybody was like breastfeeding like, but my wife was never. You know, she luckily was never it wasn't like a taboo, taboo thing. But I do remember like the hard thing for us was is the baby getting enough?

Speaker 3:

like that was hard, because a bottle you can see exactly how much, exactly how much you're getting.

Speaker 1:

But you don't know if they're getting four sips or four ounces, you know.

Speaker 2:

And if you have a baby that's a little skinny, you're all self-conscious, you don't know. There's all those dynamics. So I think it's interesting, right. So you're trying to help women from an aspect of a lot of women don't have that support, a communal support of just the experience, but then also a lot of women it's very individual how they experience it.

Speaker 3:

For sure.

Speaker 2:

Sometimes it's not naturally. It's a natural act. Like you said, that doesn't come naturally.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Which I love that.

Speaker 3:

That's a great way of saying it.

Speaker 2:

That's a really good way to say it, and so it might be painful and they think they're not doing it right. Yeah, so I'd love for you to explain your position and how you help women overcome their individual circumstances, but also the communal aspect of coming together and helping these women.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Because I think a lot of women want to give up after a week.

Speaker 3:

Oh, for sure.

Speaker 2:

And no one talks about it.

Speaker 3:

Including myself.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Well, everyone always thinks they're doing it wrong. They always think, yeah, the baby's not getting enough. And the hard thing is is they're constantly eating. They're growing at the fastest rate that they'll ever grow in their whole life. That's why they're eating so much. But as a mom, you're thinking, oh, it's because they're not getting enough from me.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 3:

So you worry about that. But no, like, the most important thing for me when I started was creating a community, and I mean the easiest way to do that is on social media. So Instagram was like our first hit and it was important for me to create educational content to let parents know the normalcies of that. It is normal the baby's eating this much. It's not normal for it to be painful. It may be at first, but that's because we don't have a proper latch and so creating content around the educational aspect of everything, breastfeeding that's just really how I started.

Speaker 3:

I didn't ever really post like selling content, but I would like. My main focus since the beginning is, like we do 90% educational content that helps people understand their breastfeeding journey on whatever journey you're on, because, like you said, they're all different but then people trust us and know that we're there for them and then so, like when we introduce a new product, they trust that it's a product that they'll need because we're there for them first. You know, I always say we're a community first and we sell product second. That's just how it goes.

Speaker 1:

Totally. How long were you a community before you sold?

Speaker 3:

Good question. So I actually, before the little milk bar, I owned a company called lot 801. It was like I sewed baby leggings and sold them on Etsy, so I started my Instagram there. And then, when I started a little milk bar, I introduced our like milk maker t-shirt and that sold out in 24 hours. And then we doubled inventory sold out in 48 hours. So that's when I rebranded from La Ida one to the little milk bar. So I kind of already had a community.

Speaker 3:

It wasn't specific to breastfeeding before that, though, so it was almost like immediately we just like, made that switch super early and was like this is what we are now.

Speaker 1:

Very cool.

Speaker 3:

Take it or leave it.

Speaker 1:

Follow or unfollow. Yeah, for sure there's a really cool. I'm not a huge fan of like bringing up books because I think people can get lost in reading books and thinking that they can be really good business leaders because of books. But there is like a famous book uh out there by gary vaynerchuk called jab jab, jab, right hook I think I have that book.

Speaker 1:

I haven't read it but and the whole premise is exactly what you said. So he said most, most the the metaphor. Is it a metaphor, right, not a simile? I think it's. I'm looking at you because this is something you would know. Yeah, metaphor, yeah.

Speaker 2:

Metaphor, is it a?

Speaker 1:

metaphor, right, not a simile. I'm looking at you because this is something you would know. Yeah, a metaphor. Yeah, the metaphors are in boxing, which is like boxers don't go out throwing haymakers 24-7. If they did, they would lose. They would get really tired because you're not going to land a haymaker all the time. But what they do is they jab people and they weaken, weaken, weaken, weaken, weaken, and then they hook them after they've weakened them. And so he relates that to selling. That's kind of like somewhat of a more aggressive way to talk about it. You know what I mean, but that's what the whole book is about. It's like give, give, give, give, give, then ask, and that ask will be tenfold more likely to be accepted versus ask, ask, ask, ask, ask well, establish, basically establishing trust, and then ask yeah for a transaction.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, for sure yeah, and so with that, when I first started a little milk bar it was merch like that we did milk maker t-shirts, mind your own tits t-shirts, all of that. And then, about three years ago, was when I introduced my first like we call them, our essential products which is a product that we developed ourselves. It's not a t-shirt that was screen printed on and that was the alley bra, and so I feel like I warmed my audience enough with the education and also the merch, but then we introduced the alley bra named.

Speaker 3:

So I feel like I warmed my audience enough with the education and also the merch, yeah, but then we introduced the the alley bra named after my first daughter, and it was a bra that was meant to just be everything that's. Breastfeeding is so ugly you guys like it looks like your great-great-grandma would wear it and it's got all these clasps yeah and some of them are fine.

Speaker 3:

But when I was after giving birth, I just wanted to like lay in bed and be comfortable, and so I wanted a bra that didn't have the snaps like on the shoulders, and so we created this bra that's to lounge in at home and feel like yourself a little bit. So when we introduced that product, I feel like it was kind of like all these years of us warming up our audience with the merch, which they loved, but like again, 90% educational content. Then we introduced the Ali bra and it just blew up.

Speaker 2:

Like.

Speaker 3:

I was terrified to do this because I had to invest so much money into a product when you're developing it yourself and you don't really know what you're doing. So I was like, hey, we're going to do this, guys, we're going to release this product. I think my minimum order quantity was like 5,000 units.

Speaker 1:

Oh my gosh yeah.

Speaker 3:

And I had three different colors. Because I had three different colors.

Speaker 1:

And sizes.

Speaker 3:

Yes.

Speaker 1:

And so.

Speaker 3:

I was like you guys, this launches tonight to like our VIP group. I'm reaching out to my customer service girls. I've got three girls that do it for me and I'm like, hey, if we sell out of this product in like six months, I'll be happy like yeah by the end of the year, like we'll be good. So it went live and we're all like watching the computers and we sold out in like three hours and it was like a quarter of a million dollars in three hours.

Speaker 3:

I was like holy shit, Can I swear here? You can.

Speaker 1:

Holy shoot. We'll mark it explicit. You can take it off if you need to.

Speaker 2:

We'll bleep it.

Speaker 3:

But I was just like whoa, okay, so that's when my light bulb went off of. Like we really have created the best community ever and so I have so many more product ideas, not just the bra. Like there's so many things I want to do, and that was just the green light for me, like, okay, we're ready, let's go, and is that still bestseller today?

Speaker 1:

yes, awesome, yeah, for sure what were the other products that subsequently followed that?

Speaker 3:

yeah, so we did the Ali bra um, reusable nursing pads, okay, um. And the Frankie tanks, which is just people see it and they're like it just is a regular tank top, which is exactly what we wanted.

Speaker 3:

We didn't want it to have the snaps, because as soon as you're done breastfeeding, you throw it away. Right, this you can wear whenever you want it, for as long as you want. But, um, but, the Frankie tank is a nursing tank. And then I've got two more products that are coming out later this year. Oh, and the Allie shorts we added like a matching bottom for postpartum, nice, very cool.

Speaker 1:

So what is your like? How is your community approach and your content approach changed since you've? Because merch is. So when you're a merch brand, it's very easy to be educational, because the merch is just something that your biggest fans will buy from you. You might not necessarily run ads for it, or maybe you do, maybe you did you know, um? But then when you start to actually become a like a brand outside of merch and this community, that sells.

Speaker 1:

A lot of brands want to be a lot more of the hook, hook, hook, hook hook, rather than the jabs like how is your content strategy?

Speaker 3:

change like. It's so much easier really yeah, and this and this is why.

Speaker 3:

So with me, from the beginning, the little milk bar we always said you don't have to buy a brand new wardrobe as a breastfeeding mom, cause there's this whole nursing friendly vibe out there, which is great and some women women love it. But I'm like you can wear all the same regular clothes. It's just society is telling you you can't, because you don't want to have to lift up your shirt or whatever. But you can. So we've, from the beginning, with merch, have created content around. You can wear whatever you want to and still breastfeed your baby in public or at home, and this is how you do it. So when I introduced, like the alley bra, the Frankie tank, it was just an addition to that content. So it's like now that we're showing you how to breastfeed in this Milkmaker t-shirt. Now we just have our Frankie tank underneath with it, which is like called the two shirt method.

Speaker 3:

So some women don't want like their belly hanging out or their back. And so, like all of our products are in compliment, like it compliments the merch product, so it's it's been an easy transition.

Speaker 1:

I feel like Awesome, and are you still putting out a ton of that educational stuff does? Did that change like? Do you feel find yourself putting more stuff that's salesy in that, or are you finding a way to sell within the educational, I think, content?

Speaker 3:

my idea is like I don't want people to know they're being sold to sure, so I'm creating educational content, but I'm always wearing something of the little milk bar, so it's like that, that natural, organic of like oh, this was great information, but where'd you get that bra? A lot of people don't even know we sell the bra, but then we'll respond to it and say you know, you can find it in our shop.

Speaker 2:

Click the link in profile.

Speaker 3:

Or a lot of people are just replying back for us now Like our own customers are like hey, they sell it, you should go get it.

Speaker 2:

It's interesting because it's kind of the antithesis of most of the baby industry.

Speaker 3:

Because my hot take about the baby industry is.

Speaker 2:

80% of the baby industry is built on selling first-time moms things that they'll never use again.

Speaker 3:

It's like you need this and the first-time mom will buy it and then on their next kid.

Speaker 1:

They won't use it.

Speaker 3:

You need the baby warmer or the baby wipe warmer thing, and like the genie, there are a couple things that negate that right, like a diaper bag, will be used.

Speaker 1:

It can, yeah, oftentimes the whole time. A crib will oftentimes a car seat can be used well as long as the standards are still up to date.

Speaker 2:

But you're right, like the, the changing pad we have all of the niceties that you that are supposed to make your life easier.

Speaker 2:

Often don't, yeah, and you don't really end up using, like I think about all the stuff my wife got when we had theo and on the third kid, we don't use, yeah, anything.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, like anything at all. Yeah, like she's just like obviously like clothes and diapers, but like that's pretty much. Use anything, anything at all, obviously clothes and diapers, but that's pretty much. It's like oh yeah, baby's not that complicated, it's not as complicated as people make you think it is, which is interesting because you're basically telling people the opposite, where a lot of the industry is telling you you need all of these things, based off of fear tactics or based off of, oh, it's going to make your life easier, whatever their selling point is like you need to get all this stuff as a mom, and you're telling moms oh, I'm just going to give you this information and this isn't something you need, but it's nice and I like it and it's going to make your life. You know it can make your life easier because it's cute, you can breastfeed with it, but at the end of the day, you don't have to have something.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, People will comment and be like well then, what do I need your shirt for? And I'm like you don't, but if you like it, you can buy it.

Speaker 1:

And then, surprisingly, they like you more because you said that and they buy it yeah.

Speaker 2:

Well, I actually think a lot of consumers want to be sold something like in that kind of way now, because everyone says you need everything, yeah. And I think there's a lot of consumers out there that say just just be up front with me, yeah, when you flip.

Speaker 3:

Do I need this?

Speaker 2:

no, but if you like it like I'm not selling this because you have to have it, but like if you like it and you like the style and you it has a nice use, then buy it well, I went to.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I went to, I'm not hiding that we're selling something just to add on to what you're saying.

Speaker 1:

I went to, uh, like a there was a car like a tire shop by my house and I'm like the most you know I'm I'm the guy that doesn't trust a mechanic. I think they're always overselling me because I don't know anything about cars. So I hate going in because I'm like I know I'm spending way too much money. But I've gone back to these guys for the past four years because, like I went in I needed new tires and the first question the guy asked me was like how long you have the car for, you know, and I'm like I'm planning on selling it in a year. He's like, oh, let's get you the worst tires. Then he's like you don't need to spend 1500 bucks on tires, let's get you out of the door with $600 worth of tires. And I'm like nice.

Speaker 1:

I'm going to go back, you know, cause he could have. He could have sold me on $1,200 tires or whatever, and I would have just bought them Cause, yeah, that's what I'm up against, right, I don't know any better, but when he's like, these will be just fine for eight months for you, you know, or whatever. So I agree.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, how have you noticed that that strategy has galvanized your customers to you?

Speaker 3:

Absolutely yeah, it's intentional.

Speaker 3:

I mean, I'm so upfront with everything that we do. I even like when we develop the new products, I'll video like little steps along the way to show them why we did it this way and why we think that this could be helpful, and ideas we took from, like other things that we saw. And so people like feeling a part of that but also knowing, like like when we did our Frankie tanks and I'm like it does look like a regular nursing tank If you are a regular tank top and if you can find one that cause a lot of the times you pull the neck and then it gets stretched out.

Speaker 3:

Um, if you can find one that does that Awesome.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

But like we can guarantee ours, don't. So if you're on the lookout for one, here it is.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, here it is. This episode is brought to you today by Bestie. If you are an e-commerce store on Shopify, stop and listen up. Are you surveying your customers? Do you know how they get to your website? Do you know what marketing channel introduced them to you? Do you know what motivated them to buy? Do you know what your MPS score is, if people actually like and love your products? If you don't know the answers to some of those questions, or any other questions you might have for your customers, you need to start using post-purchase surveys. Bestie is the only post-purchase survey provider that utilizes AI to not only help you craft your questions, but also takes the insights that your customers give you and creates actionable insights and steps for you to make as a business to help grow and scale your company.

Speaker 1:

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Speaker 1:

We love Bestie and we use it for every single brand we work with. Go check them out today at bestieai. So what I'm hearing is like there's a couple of things that I think people need to know, because what we see with a lot of brands that create content I mean because every brand is creating content on Instagram and TikTok and Pinterest or whatever but if you were a brand that started in, like, when did you start?

Speaker 3:

2018.

Speaker 1:

Okay, so you started after this, but like brands that started in, like 2015, 16, 17, when before the pay-to-play model hit meaning organic reach was easy yeah, and you could literally just like you would see everyone you followed, you would see their posts no matter what, as long as you're the algorithm. Yeah, so you could sell and you could literally just sell and people would buy. It wasn't about creating content that helped other people like you could just sell and sell and sell.

Speaker 1:

But what happened is like that trans, like a lot of brands, have had a really hard time moving away from that, even today, like you know, six years later, seven years later, um, but what you're saying is like hey, if I create educational content that has to do with the products that I'm selling, obviously you know it's not like you're creating educational content about, like best hotels to stay at or something that has nothing to do with it, right?

Speaker 1:

So in the realm and I'm super transparent then what happens is I build a, I build trust within a group of people who like me the things that I'm doing, and then when I introduce products, those people generally are the type of people who are going to want this type of product, right? And so they're going to say, oh, I could buy on Amazon or I could go get this shirt or I could go get that, right, but like I'm going to but we're also fighting for them.

Speaker 3:

So, like we are, so we have a pretty large community on Instagram. I want to like 170,000 followers. I think TikTok, we might have a little bit more, but like we're very vocal, Like when we see stories in the news, we talk about it. Like we use our platform to be able to talk about those things, and so I think that builds a lot of trust, too, that we're not just saying Give me an example of a story.

Speaker 1:

I want to break this down because I think I know where you're going with it.

Speaker 3:

Well, there's a few different ones, but I'll tell you this one first. When I first started on Instagram, we couldn't post our content because it was against community guidelines.

Speaker 1:

Okay, and is that because you were showing-.

Speaker 3:

We were just a breastfeeding mom.

Speaker 3:

I think it was like considered nudity, it was sexual nudity content, and so I'm like, how do I sell a product if I can't post about it? And they're taking down everything? So, instead of just like shutting down, I use that as momentum. So we, I like, screenshotted everything that they weren't allowing and telling us was sexual content, but content they were allowing that actually was sexual content. So I went public, posted about it on Instagram, called them out, we started a petition. We got like 30,000 parents to sign it in like a week, and so Instagram was in the process of changing their guidelines for birth with Empowered Birth Project, another account, and so we got their attention and, in that process, help them change their policies to allow breastfeeding content. It's still struggle. There's still times where our content just the other day, we'll get flagged.

Speaker 3:

I posted, I got flagged and they were like you can either take this down, which is weird. I've never got this one. You can either take it down or we're going to stop showing it to your followers. I didn't take it down, but it happens all the time. But so, like doing that, though, our community sees this and they're like, well, you actually are doing something about this. You're not just complaining about this. We're trying to change the world. But the airline stories yeah, there's always an airline story.

Speaker 1:

There was one recently that what happens on airlines so you, like women, have gotten kicked off they'll be breastfeeding, and then somebody will complain, right?

Speaker 2:

yes, and you'll get kicked out of a yeah that happens.

Speaker 3:

I didn't know this or they tell them that they can't, and it probably depends on like the. It depends on the agent. Is it the?

Speaker 2:

agent? Is it the country? What is this? It's the agent, okay.

Speaker 3:

So one mom just is suing Delta right now because and we covered her story when it happened a few months ago she was refused her pump, which a pump is a medical device, so you are allowed to take that in addition to a carry on.

Speaker 1:

Oh into a carry-on, oh cool.

Speaker 3:

And so she goes, but they would not let her take it onto the plane. They made her check it, which is not. That's not cool.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you don't do that. It's against the law Anyways. So because she couldn't pump. There might be some temperature fluctuations right that could damage it.

Speaker 3:

No, the pump.

Speaker 2:

Like if it goes to check-. The cargo.

Speaker 3:

It's like super cold right, Doesn't it?

Speaker 2:

get a lot colder, so it could damage a medical device Probably.

Speaker 3:

So she gets to the other, she's flying and she's drenched in breast milk because she didn't have her baby with her and she couldn't pump and that causes a lot of issues. You can get mastitis like you can get infection. It's hard.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, and mastitis is crazy, it is yeah.

Speaker 3:

She was it's hard, oh yeah so she is crazy, it is.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, she was drenched in her own breast sitting in her chair drenched because she couldn't pump, so anyways, now she's suing delta because because this happened and it's insane- so the reason why I wanted you to share some examples is because another thing that, like we've discovered as we've talked to brands who are winning, who win when it comes to creating content and creating communities, is they're not afraid to go after an enemy not that you're making airlines an enemy but but they will be our enemies, or they are our enemies sometimes, but yes, yeah but you like, like when you can call somebody out and have good merit or reason for it and, like I said, kind of create this enemy, what happens is the community will latch on to you, they're as angry as you are, or pun intended.

Speaker 1:

I wish there was pun intended on that. I'm not clever enough for puns like that.

Speaker 2:

They get a nice secure latch.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, like when they latch securely, no, but yeah, the industry won't. The community latches on and says like she just gave me permission to now speak up about this because I was not willing to right, and it's really really cool to see that like it's like something that brings you, brings you closer together, like it's, it's almost like it's emotional like the messages we get every day of women that are like I was terrified to breastfeed in public until you posted like.

Speaker 3:

I posted a lot of different stories, but one in particular was like how to breastfeed in public when you're around family at Christmas and if your family is like super conservative and doesn't like it, this is how you can handle it and so we'll get like DMs. Like that changed my life Like for the first time I breastfed in public and I didn't go sit in my car and it's like, oh my gosh, that's amazing.

Speaker 3:

Or even just a mom, we get this one a lot. I was in Target and I had my cart full about to check out and my baby was hungry, so I was about to leave my cart, go to my car and go feed but then I saw a girl turn the corner with a milk maker t-shirt on and it was one of ours, and so she knows that she has an ally.

Speaker 2:

Cool.

Speaker 3:

So she's like. So I just walked over to her and I said, can I sit by you? And she felt comfortable enough and she knew that mom would protect her if she needed to. But that is so cool, yeah. Like they're creating their own connections in our community, like that's awesome.

Speaker 1:

That's so cool. What their own connections in our community Like that's awesome, that's so cool what? Okay, so you got this.

Speaker 2:

And I was going to bring up not all the enemy but niche. We talked about two things niches and enemies, and you're kind of doing both.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

You found a niche community that you're meeting a need of theirs that hasn't been met yet, and you can easily. Usually niche comes with an enemy too right Parts of it have been met yet, and you can easily. Usually niche comes with an enemy too right parts of it have been met. You've been able to attack the enemy.

Speaker 1:

Parts of it have been met, which is like people have created products for your community yeah but nobody's created a voice, no one's, for the community given or let the mothers know they had a voice.

Speaker 3:

So it like really angers me. When we start to talk about breastfeeding brands. I'm like how many pump brands are out there and none of them educate? Their customers on like their laws when they go back to work.

Speaker 1:

What a wild wildness.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, like it's so true.

Speaker 1:

You know what a cool collaboration would be. Have you ever heard of the brand Honoring Motherhood?

Speaker 3:

No, they do. Breast milk jewelry.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, you ever heard of the brand uh, honoring motherhood?

Speaker 3:

no, they do breast milk jewelry oh yeah, I've heard of breast milk jewelry. A lot of people do that. That'd be an interesting collaboration.

Speaker 1:

But okay, so did I cut you off more I have another question okay, um, okay. So when you first start, the community is where you get your sales, like you've just been building content and that's what are you doing now from a marketing perspective. Tell me, tell us more about, like, your marketing mix. Is it only content creation? Are you running ads? Are you working with influencers? Are you?

Speaker 3:

So, I've never done. I've worked with influencers but we've never like paid someone to post. It's always been like a super organic, like they've reached out and been like hey, I'd love for you to send product, and we never like say you have to post, but 90% of the time they do, especially because packaging is our thing.

Speaker 1:

Our packaging is like top-notch everyone wants to show it nice um, but content creation.

Speaker 3:

I do run Facebook ads. Now I want to say we've been doing Facebook ads for like two years now, so that's an addition to TikTok. We blew up very fast, organically and I got so burnt out because I was the only one ever creating the content that I stepped back from TikTok for a while. So we've kind of we have plans to get back to that.

Speaker 1:

But, we.

Speaker 3:

We've done like Facebook ads, instagram ads. We opened up an affiliate program in September of last year that we're going to be pushing hard this year, but we had never done that before and that's been doing well. So let me think Did I cover all of them?

Speaker 1:

Yes, Awesome and for that affiliate stuff are people just finding that through your like content, your website, they apply.

Speaker 3:

They apply. I think most of the time we're reaching out to them. I think we're really specific on the kind of content creators we're looking for. We don't just want anyone. It's got to be someone who, you know, has a. You know, just because you're breastfeeding doesn't mean you're super passionate about it.

Speaker 2:

Right.

Speaker 3:

So it's like we're looking for the right content creators that align with our voice.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, very smart. What's cool about when you have a brand like yours, which is like a problem solution brand? It's kind of interesting. What you've created is a problem solution product. That is also a want, like it's not quite a need, like what?

Speaker 2:

you said yeah, it's not. I don't know if you deem it a problem solution but it's more of the community and it's a way of validating. It's like a.

Speaker 1:

It's like a middle, middle line, which is really really cool Cause you kind of like you can, you can feed on both the emotional and logical side of the consumer.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, right, which is really interesting, and people make emotional decisions, not logical ones.

Speaker 1:

Exactly.

Speaker 2:

So it allows them to emotionally purchase and then logically justify it because it might have a feature.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, totally, which is really cool, because that's what I love. What you said is like hey, we work with influencers but we never really paying them. That happens with a lot of brands like this, Like brands that because I say this all the time like people don't share good things, they share what makes them look good. And you're providing all this like really valuable information, this product that solves people's. It does, in the end, solve a problem.

Speaker 1:

It can, and so people, just like influencers, they like. Their entire ethos is to provide value to their audience in some way or another, whether that's fashion tips or baby tips or travel tips or whatever. And this, like your product, is something so easy for them to say just send it to me and I'll talk about it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

And so I think it's really cool when you can find that like I don't know where I'm trying to go with this, but this like middle line product is a really cool place to see.

Speaker 2:

Well, just going back to the community, building around a niche we've talked about this right. The beauty of a niche is like you don't feel the volatility that other companies are feeling right now. Yeah Right, A lot of companies are getting hit really hard in the last 12 months and companies like you are not. Like you're probably seeing pretty steady growth year over year.

Speaker 1:

We're just assuming yeah, yeah, yes, I think that's a pretty safe assumption.

Speaker 2:

It's a pretty safe assumption, right? Yes, look at us. A lot of companies aren't Like a regular old kind of e-commerce company. There's a lot of them out there that, like their CPAs, have gone way up their cost per acquisition. They don't. They're kind of in this phase where you're not feeling it, because you have this emotional connection to a community and this niche need market.

Speaker 2:

That is hard to replicate too, Now the problem with the niche is that we don't know how big your business can get, and that might not be a problem. I think a lot of people view this as a problem. I don't think it's a problem, because it just depends on what you want with your business, right. Like, maybe you don't really care if it's a hundred million dollar business, maybe you're just trying to be a voice and that satisfies it, and then the business side's great. And so the problem with the niche is it's hard to grow past a certain point.

Speaker 2:

What that point is like, I'm not sure to say. It could be one, five, 10 million, 30 million, I don't know what it is, but there is usually a plateau. But every company hits a plateau anyways. Right, and so for you, have you seen that steady growth over the last three years, or have you seen a hit? And I'd love for you to explain what you've seen from your side so that our listeners can understand, like, hey, when you target in on a niche, whether that's for a product or for a brand or a company, however you're marketing how it can help you stabilize your growth as well.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so I haven't seen a big hit. We've grown year over year like a lot.

Speaker 1:

Awesome.

Speaker 3:

Which has been great.

Speaker 2:

I think this last year we've grown the least amount, but it wasn't anything. I mean, you're still growing, right?

Speaker 3:

So there's nothing crazy there, but I think I think it's our community. Just there's no other community like it on social media, there really isn't. Like I think they just trust us so much and we fight for them so much and like they believe in it so much, just as much as I do. Like it's crazy the messages we get sometimes that it's like wow, like you guys care about this as much as me, wow, like you guys care about this as much as me. But I think, because we've created so much transparency like when we develop new products, I show them the process and this is how it came in and this is why I developed it and this is why we did this piece of content, because the other day this uncle said something to me while I was feeding and so many people can just relate to that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

You know, and when something's relatable it's easy to sell to. I even hate using that word. I don't like feeling like I'm selling to them. But yeah, it's been. It's been a crazy roller coaster. I didn't know how much we could grow. Like when we were doing the merch. I was like, oh, this is great. Like I just remember thinking if I can make $2,000 a month and like maybe pay more mortgage, then I'm going to be great. You know, but then it just like grew 600% after that first year.

Speaker 3:

And my goal was to let my well my. I was working from home with my kids. My husband was a oh my gosh. What was he? A property manager at Hilton for like years. And I remember after that first year I asked my husband if you quit? It was right during COVID and 2020, so a year and a half later I asked him will you quit your job If you quit your job? Because if I can grow it this much by staying home with the kids, I can't imagine what we could do if I had it full time.

Speaker 1:

Sure yeah.

Speaker 3:

And so he's like yeah, I'm burnt out, I'm ready.

Speaker 1:

And a perfect time for him to quit, too right.

Speaker 2:

Perfect time, yeah, during COVID. It was awful. And so no one was going to hotels.

Speaker 1:

No.

Speaker 3:

So he quit and we're like just give me one year and I promise I could double it, and I think that was the year we did like 600% over. And so he's still at home, he's still a stay-at-home dad Awesome, very cool. It's been cool.

Speaker 1:

The other thing I like about this audience. I love that we're just like breaking things down now and just talking about what we love about it. But what I love is that, like the baby audience, the motherhood audience, what's really cool is you lose people every day, but you gain people every day.

Speaker 1:

Like so there's people who just come in and out. So it's just this like talk about total addressable market that you I mean. Technically it's shrinking because not as many people are having babies, but you're probably not seeing that right, because the total addressable market is still so big.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, not as many people are having babies, but the population's grown so much that I don't know if the aggregation is less or not. Totally Well, and I'll go look at the census, but I doubt. The aggregation of all babies born is less than 10 years ago.

Speaker 1:

Have you heard about the Ozempic babies? I have. Have you heard about this? I have heard of it.

Speaker 3:

I read like an article about it the other day.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, like the two things is one it counteracts birth control or it can counteract birth control.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I just is it the weight loss?

Speaker 1:

pill. So there's two things that's happening. One, it can counteract birth control. So women who have been on birth control and who you know, aren't expecting it, are getting pregnant, yeah they're getting pregnant. And two, if your health, your weight, was at a point that you were able to be sexually active without protection.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Your weight hits a point that allows you to now have kids again, and so there's this like wave of what they're calling him the Ozempic baby.

Speaker 2:

So there's a wave of there's a baby boom from Ozempic. Yes, that's insane. Now how?

Speaker 1:

big it is, I don't know. So your business might grow a little bit more. Thank you, ozempic. Thank you Kim.

Speaker 3:

Kardashian.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and Elon Musk.

Speaker 2:

Is there any Elon Musk on it too? I honestly have no idea who's on it everyone, I think everyone is. I heard about it I the first time I heard about ozempic was like a week ago.

Speaker 1:

Oh, it's been a big trend for like 18 months or so.

Speaker 3:

That's, I don't know I I barely recently heard about it too.

Speaker 1:

Yeah I know I can count on both hands people I know in my life really on it, and I guarantee you guys can too, if you like. It is really popular. I'll ask around, but I come from a very I don't think tons of people love to admit it.

Speaker 2:

I'm from a very nonchalant in terms of Nobody really cares or watches.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's a big celebrity push. Ozempic has been a big.

Speaker 2:

Oh, the celebs are pushing it Massive. They got contracts, affiliate codes.

Speaker 1:

Tons of people were just seeing that celebrities were losing weight very quickly, and then somehow it got out. It's a medication, I think, for diabetes.

Speaker 2:

It's called Ozempic and steroids. Yeah, that's how celebrities do it everyone.

Speaker 1:

Speaking of I've been wanting to bring this up Drugs. I told you guys. I have an interesting hot take-ish.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

Right, and this goes into a little bit about influencers and it goes into celebrities. So this is the time. It is kind of like shaking things up a little bit. But have you guys heard of this, like the block party stuff that's happening right now on social media?

Speaker 3:

No, Abby, have you heard of this?

Speaker 1:

Abby knows what's up. What is it? She doesn't have a mic. Ugh, Come on, Abby. So the block party is. So you guys know what the Met Gala is.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You heard of the Met Gala. I have heard of that. Yeah, so apparently it costs like $75,000 to get into this gala. Yeah, so it's $75,000 for a ticket.

Speaker 3:

Wait.

Speaker 2:

People are of ground for a ticket. Wait people there. People are. They pay to go to the Met Gala. Yes, well, it's because it's technically a fundraiser, is it? Yes, I'm pretty sure it's a fundraiser for fashion or something the Met isn't the Met, a museum, a museum yeah maybe so it's invite only, but I didn't know that they had to pay.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yes, yes, seventy five thousand dollars a head, and then most of the at least women who because, like, it's all about fashion and these outfits that the people are showing off. Hence the reason why, if you're on TikTok, that's all you're probably seeing right now these people, these people are paying like tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands of dollars for these dresses, and it's a one-time use dress. They pay for those dresses. I thought they just A lot of them are paying for them. Yep, it's a one-time use dress.

Speaker 2:

I thought the designers just threw it on them for free, because they cut them off.

Speaker 1:

They have to cut them out of it, like they build them into it and they have to cut them out of it. So it's this one-time use. So it yeah, I'm telling you. Maybe not all of them are All.

Speaker 2:

I know about the Met Gala is it's just the Hunger Games, right.

Speaker 3:

Isn't that just like the Hunger Games capital? Yeah, oh my gosh, that's exactly how I feel.

Speaker 1:

So this is what I'm talking about, okay.

Speaker 2:

Aren't those supposed to be the bad guys? Why do we think this?

Speaker 1:

is the good guys. Well, listen, listen, what is going on. Listen to me. Okay, did they? $20,000 purse made of ice, so it was just melting the whole time, like this is. So what's happening right now is there's this big revolt that's happening on TikTok from just regular people like us who are saying so they're doing a block party instead of a Met Gala.

Speaker 1:

These people are so out of touch with the world Like right now you've got several wars happening and people who are dying and they're saying it's like, hey, we're all living in the same world but on two different planets. So you got people who are dying. You got people like us, who are more fortunate, who are experiencing crazy economic times here in the united states, where like to pay for rent alone or gas or just housing.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, housing costs have gone up, like I'm sure you guys have felt this, like I think our our grocery bill in the last eight months have gone up 45, 50 percent, you know. And so they're just saying this is how crazy and out of touch. So what's happening is all these people like millions of views, millions and tens of millions of views of telling people to block celebrities. So they're blocking taylor swift and they're blocking kim kardashian and they're swift at the met gala.

Speaker 3:

No, I don't think she was, but she hasn't been in seven years we have a swifty we have a swifty here.

Speaker 2:

Oh my gosh, we're in the presence of a swifty in real life swifty in the flesh, swifty in the wild. We've talked about swifties a lot, yeah, um, but yeah. So they're talking about community building. She's built, so kim kardashian lost like.

Speaker 1:

Two million followers like overnight.

Speaker 3:

Oh did she yeah and and so there's this.

Speaker 1:

There's this. The reason why they're doing it is to say, hey, like these women, these people not women, men and women are getting paid millions and millions of dollars through endorsements she was also just booed at.

Speaker 2:

Let's get rid of. Yeah, she was been a bad week for cam yeah, kim's had a rough week.

Speaker 1:

Tom Brady's roast was rough, but just curious what your guys's thoughts are like on this. Like, should we be worshiping these celebrities the way that?

Speaker 2:

we all kind of have been for the last course.

Speaker 1:

We should not worship celebrities well, I know that that's the obvious answer. So what do you do not to like? What is what is?

Speaker 2:

well, it's easy for me. I just I don't watch anything well, well, hold up, hold up.

Speaker 1:

You went and saw dune. Uh, yeah, I saw dune, and and who's one of what's the girl in dune?

Speaker 2:

that is one of the the main characters oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, uh, like zendaya, zendaya, and she was at the met gala.

Speaker 1:

She's part of this yeah it's.

Speaker 2:

It's a tough line to walk right, because movies are great and stories are important. Right, stories are what create cultural bonds and ties and identity, and so movies are a form of telling those stories. So movies are great. However, I think I think it's more of a cultural rot to the extent of the way people worship celebrities. But I don't know like, was it better 20 years ago? I don't know like it's like everyone always thinks it was better back in the day, but frank sinatra was practically a god. He could do whatever he wanted. So has it gotten worse now? Or is it just more visible because of social media?

Speaker 3:

I don't know. I think it's definitely just more visible because of social media, but it is hard to see that we've got wars going on and then they're like walking down this red carpet with these $100,000 gowns and $75,000 to pay to go and just moving on with the world.

Speaker 1:

The $20,000 ice purse is what got me. That's pretty crazy.

Speaker 3:

Because back in the day, celebrities dressed extravagantly but not to the point that they do now. They're trying to make headlines now, right, I think that's the difference.

Speaker 2:

I don't know if celebrity worship has gotten worse or not, but celebrity exuberance has gotten worse or at least displayed in a far more extravagant way.

Speaker 1:

Social media definitely allows you to, well, and you even just saying that you worship Kim Kardashian or Taylor Swift on social media can get you views too. That's true. So it may be something that you don't, maybe don't really feel that way that could be the milk bar strategy. Just call the Swifties Send out the Swifty signal, they will do anything. It's like the milk bar strategy Just call the Swifties. Yeah, send out the Swifty signal.

Speaker 2:

They will do anything. It's like the bat signal you turn it on and they all just come running.

Speaker 1:

I made a comment about Taylor Swift and keep in mind I really like Taylor Swift. I actually legitimately do. I think that her music is great. My kids love her music. I'm a fan. I respect her.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I'm not a fan, but I respect her.

Speaker 1:

I think she is an even better businesswoman too.

Speaker 3:

She's the smartest marketing person in the world right now.

Speaker 1:

We can all learn from her too. I don't disagree with you at all.

Speaker 2:

If only we could all just go date an NFL guy.

Speaker 1:

However, I said that I think that was not a real relationship.

Speaker 3:

You don't think it is, why in the world would anybody fake that?

Speaker 2:

I think people are willing to fake a lot of things, but no, I never thought it was fake. He didn't.

Speaker 1:

I thought that it was. I thought that it was.

Speaker 3:

Why would she need that?

Speaker 2:

I don't necessarily think she needed it. I'm not saying it wasn't set up by a PR agency, though, because PR agencies do set those people up, guys, she just got her heart broken.

Speaker 1:

There's no way she's going to do that for PR.

Speaker 2:

Well, I think that sometimes it's not necessarily for her, but she's the smartest marketing person in the world. Why wouldn't she?

Speaker 3:

She didn't need that. She could have still made millions and sold tons of albums if without.

Speaker 2:

But she got even more publicity.

Speaker 1:

She did. But hey, on purpose, I'm not saying it was, I'm saying I don't think it's out of the realm of possibilities that a pr agency set them up, but I don't think they were dating as if, like they weren't, she wasn't just dating to pretend. I think that I agree with that. I was more so on the pr setup. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Initiation piece because that does happen with celebrities all the time.

Speaker 1:

That is a true thing but I but I was and I talked about how great she was like, like, how much I liked her, and I posted it. But your reaction times 10 online. I posted a clip and people like went berserk, hundreds of thousands of views, berserk at me.

Speaker 3:

And it was so funny Every time they would say something.

Speaker 1:

I'm like I agree with you, she's the best. I'm like, yeah, I agree. And then nobody would ever respond back to me. I answered so many of the comments too.

Speaker 2:

But see that block party sentiment I think is what the Milk Bar and Lindsay is capturing on another level.

Speaker 1:

Explain what you mean.

Speaker 2:

Well, if you think about the extravagance of the celebrities at the Met Gala and how unrelatable it is, right it just puts people off. It's like, dude, my groceries hurt. Like it hurts to buy groceries and you guys are wearing a $30,000 dress that you throw away Like it hurts to buy groceries and you guys are wearing a $30,000 dress that you throw away Like we're just. That's not.

Speaker 3:

It really does feel like the Hunger Games.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it is just like that, and we're still privileged living, where we live and what we have.

Speaker 3:

So I'm not trying to act like I'm.

Speaker 2:

But there's so many people out there where it has hurt tremendously the last couple of years with inflation, I mean they're in a very bad spot and so and we all know people in bad spots and we feel it, and so then you see them. But with breastfeeding, I think there was just this kind of a status quo, right, this like elegance of like you're not allowed to show, like this part of being a mom and being a woman which is just a natural part of being a mom and a woman, and a great part of being a mom and a woman which is breastfeeding. Yeah, and I know some women can't do it and you know we're not.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

We don't need to go into all like the side conversations. So just know we understand there's other side conversations here, but in this particular situation there's a lot of women that are like nothing is relatable. I just want to breastfeed my child and live a normal life, but the expectation is that I have to be a robot.

Speaker 3:

Even other breastfeeding brands. Again, it gets me so riled up they're selling a nursing, nursing bra.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

And you'll go to their website.

Speaker 1:

You want to name, drop any of them.

Speaker 3:

No, everybody knows who they are.

Speaker 2:

I'm sure whoever's listening can name, at least five or six.

Speaker 3:

But you go to their website and they're selling like, maybe maternity clothes, and it's not even a mother who's really pregnant. It's a model with a baby bump strap on.

Speaker 2:

And it's like why are you?

Speaker 3:

not showing real women. I mean, obviously that model is a real woman, but she's not pregnant. Or they're selling postpartum clothing and yeah, it's not a postpartum body and everybody does look different. Some people, you know know, look different than other people. But your body's jello after you have a baby, especially a few days, you know, and it's really hard when you go to these websites to go buy something that's supposed to be for you and you're like, but I don't look like that that's not gonna fit on me, yeah and look like that.

Speaker 2:

So it's, by the way, that's like most. We've talked about this before. Not to interject, lindsay, but you can speak to this better than we can. The three months postpartum what do you call that? The fourth trimester?

Speaker 3:

Fourth trimester right.

Speaker 2:

Is the most vulnerable time in a woman's life. Like I, think you feel the most vulnerable. Yeah, even more vulnerable than when you were pregnant.

Speaker 3:

And your hormones are going crazy Like you're out of whack. Yeah, but then, yeah, you like, go to this website. You see this nursing bra that they're trying to sell, and they don't even show that the woman's not even breastfeeding in the in the image. And you're like, well then, how does the bra work? Yeah does it snap down? Like do you pull it to the side? How do I use this?

Speaker 3:

and for so long breastfeeding has been censored, for even people that are selling to breastfeeding women. Yeah, and I'm not afraid, like I will claim this we're one of the first brands that has shown that, like when we do model searches I don't do model searches it's like we reach out to our community totally. If you've had a baby in the last few weeks and you want to be paid to be in our ad or our campaign, come because we want to show and I love it when we do that, because then so many comments when we do a release will be like oh my gosh, it's so nice to see a real postpartum postpartum body that looks like mine right.

Speaker 3:

Like you know, we don't look perfectly snatched back after having a baby.

Speaker 1:

So there's that two planets different world same world, two planets is what you said.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, or we can say or would it be one planet, two worlds?

Speaker 1:

I. I think either works.

Speaker 2:

Well, two planets is referring to like an astronomical object. So I think it would technically need to be one planet, two worlds.

Speaker 1:

I think you're right, but I think either way works if you want to be correct.

Speaker 2:

I just think it makes more sense.

Speaker 1:

Let's end on this.

Speaker 2:

So the Met Gala is the motherhood brands that won't even show motherhood.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Right yeah.

Speaker 1:

Little Milk Bar is.

Speaker 2:

And Little Milk Bar is the block party.

Speaker 1:

We're the block party. Who are we blocking next? Drake?

Speaker 3:

Drake's already blocked. Are we Kendrick Lamar.

Speaker 1:

Are you guys fans?

Speaker 2:

We're watching it, I'm not a Drake fan at all. Are you a Kendrick Lamar? Are you guys fans? We're watching it. I'm not a Drake fan at all are you a?

Speaker 3:

Kendrick fan.

Speaker 1:

I'm not either of them that much, but I am more him than Drake.

Speaker 3:

Drake is not even on the same level as Kendrick. I'm just not into the rap scene.

Speaker 2:

I haven't been for like 10 years.

Speaker 1:

I'm more into like 90s, early 2000s rap like Bone Thugs-N-Dog, harmony dude all day long man.

Speaker 2:

I know Kendrick is like a lyrical genius right and he's a musical genius. I know Drake is too technically.

Speaker 3:

Drake makes hits. Drake is not a lyrical genius, well a music genius. Or a marketing genius, whatever you want to call it, and he's great and I like his music, so I'll say I'm a fan. But the fact that they're. It's not even the same playing field All right, that's your hot take for the day, but is it?

Speaker 2:

true. Is Drake really the things they're saying?

Speaker 3:

Drake. Kendrick killed Drake.

Speaker 1:

Kendrick doesn't lie.

Speaker 2:

Well, I know Kendrick killed him in the battle. That's what they're saying, is it true?

Speaker 1:

Drake has done the naughty things that Kendrick is suggesting?

Speaker 3:

Oh, I don't know. No, we'll never know, we'll never know.

Speaker 1:

Alright, well, we can end there.

Speaker 2:

We can just block them all. I guess it could all be PR too. It's probably all.

Speaker 3:

PR, just like 50 Cent and Kanye. Do you remember when their albums came out 10 years ago and it was a huge battle, but they both got double the sales out of it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they were fine, oppenheimer and Barbie, oppenbarbie, oppenbarbie.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, same thing Oppenbarbie.

Speaker 2:

Oppenbarbie.

Speaker 1:

Lindsay, thank you so much for being on the podcast. This is awesome. Where can people find Little Milk Bar?

Speaker 3:

Thelittlemilkbarcom is our website. Instagram handle is thelittle little milk bar, with a little underscore at the bottom because it's so annoying, and then on TikTok at the little milk bar.

Speaker 1:

Nice, awesome. Well, thank you so much, we really appreciate it.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, thanks for having me.

Speaker 1:

Of course, all right, everybody. Thank you so much. We'll see you guys next week. Thank you so much for listening to the Unstoppable Marketer podcast. Please go rate and subscribe the podcast, whether it's good or bad. We want to hear from you because we always want to make this podcast better. If you want to get in touch with me or give me any direct feedback, please go follow me and get in touch with me. I am at the trevor crump on both instagram and tiktok. Thank you, and we will see you next week.

Empowering Breastfeeding Journey
Breastfeeding Community and Product Development
The Truth About Baby Products
Post-Purchase Surveys and Community Building
Building a Niche Community for Breastfeeding
Celebrity Worship and Out of Touch
Breastfeeding Representation and Pop Culture